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My Move From Arch To Aptosid

I recently moved over to Aptosid, and after a few days of using it I think it’s going to be a keeper as a replacement for Arch. While it’s fresh in my mind, I thought I would share my experience of moving – from the perspective of someone who has used Arch Linux for a couple of years. I’ll give a little background, then a brief summary, then some real details on how I got some things to work.

Background

I wanted to move from Arch Linux for these primary reasons:

  • Lack of package signing and general concerns with the Arch dev’s lax security practices and attitudes (link1 link2 link3)
  • Dislike for how the Arch devs regard their users and contributors

The reasons I was reluctant to give up Arch:

  • Rolling release which I prefer over periodic large upgrades
  • Package availability and the extended AUR user-contributed repository that makes installing most software very easy
  • Ability to have a custom, lightweight, fast system without unnecessary baggage and with mostly vanilla software

My first distro was SUSE, which became a little too corporate, then Kubuntu, which I eventually found too heavily modded. When I moved to Arch, I dropped KDE and set up a minimal Openbox desktop with light, fast apps. My main system has a dual-core CPU and 2G memory, but I find running a light desktop with no swap file gives me a very responsive system that can keep up with my usual multitasking – it waits for me instead of me waiting for it. And my netbook of course runs better too. So I was shopping for a distro where I could set this up without having to remove too much.

I also gave FreeBSD and Gentoo a try, which you can read about here. FreeBSD had trouble supporting my hardware fully, and Gentoo required a lot of tweaking, and also had some security issues. I skipped testing Slackware for now because official packages seemed lacking, and I skipped Gnuffy because it inherits most of the problems of Arch. Then I tried Aptosid.

Enter Aptosid

Aptosid, made by the same developers that created the popular distro Sidux, is a rolling release distro based on Debian’s unstable “sid” branch, with some hot-fixes and scripts added to make it more stable and ready-to-run. Being a Debian system, the user has access to the huge Debian package repos. And I like their attitude, as encapsulated in the Debian Social Contract: “We will be guided by the needs of our users and the free software community.”

Aptosid does not offer a minimal CLI-only install like Arch. There are various ways to install it – generally one of their live ISOs are used (KDE full or lite, XFCE, and coming soon LXDE). I went with their XFCE version: aptosid-2011-01-geras-xfce-amd64 ISO.

After using Arch for so long, the installer caught me by surprise – I felt pampered and spoiled. First, I was expecting a text installer, and instead it booted rapidly and flawlessly into a full and attractive XFCE desktop. There was immediately a feeling of quality – I’ve never seen a live CD boot so fast and flawlessly on my home-made hardware. The GUI installer was very simple with just a few options. The only thing I would change is that it didn’t allow me to select no grub install (I wanted to handle that myself). So I told it to install grub to one of my non-boot drives just to avoid overwriting my boot drive’s MBR. Other than that it was a breeze – not bad for a 435MB ISO!

I then booted into the installed system, which also booted fast and flawlessly, picking up all the hardware without a single miss. The included gdm login manager brought me into an XFCE desktop much like the live version. I was impressed and was definitely enjoying being spoiled like this. The desktop was definitely usable as it was, and I don’t say that about many distros – normally I rip out the carpeting and start remodeling immediately. XFCE was looking the best I’ve seen it, with nice fonts and colors. And the included apps were very sane and useful. Ice Weasel (Firefox) was already in there, and I was online without having to configure a thing. I actually had to stop and consider what I wanted to do next, because I wasn’t expecting to be this far for at least a day! I opened a terminal to see what was running…

Default install processes:

UID    CMD    
root    init [5]   
root    [kthreadd]    
root    [ksoftirqd/0]    
root    [migration/0]    
root    [migration/1]    
root    [kworker/1:0]    
root    [ksoftirqd/1]    
root    [kworker/0:1]    
root    [cpuset]    
root    [khelper]    
root    [netns]    
root    [sync_supers]    
root    [bdi-default]    
root    [kintegrityd]    
root    [kblockd]    
root    [kacpid]    
root    [kacpi_notify]    
root    [kacpi_hotplug]    
root    [kseriod]    
root    [kworker/1:1]    
root    [kswapd0]    
root    [ksmd]    
root    [fsnotify_mark]    
root    [aio]    
root    [crypto]    
root    [khubd]    
root    [ata_sff]    
root    [scsi_eh_0]    
root    [scsi_eh_1]    
root    [scsi_eh_2]    
root    [scsi_eh_3]    
root    [scsi_eh_4]    
root    [scsi_eh_5]    
root    [scsi_eh_6]    
root    [scsi_eh_7]    
root    [kworker/u:5]    
root    [kworker/u:6]    
root    [usbhid_resumer]    
root    [kstriped]    
root    [kjournald]    
root    udevd --daemon   
root    udevd --daemon   
root    udevd --daemon   
root    [kpsmoused]    
root    [kworker/0:2]    
root    [hd-audio0]    
daemon  /sbin/portmap    
root    /usr/sbin/rsyslogd -c4   
root    /usr/sbin/irqbalance    
root    /usr/sbin/anacron -s   
user    /usr/sbin/famd -T 0  
root    /usr/sbin/gpm -m /dev/input/mice -t exps2
101     /usr/bin/dbus-daemon --system   
root    /usr/sbin/cron    
root    /usr/sbin/acpid    
root    [kondemand]    
root    /usr/sbin/bluetoothd    
root    [kconservative]    
root    /usr/sbin/cupsd -C /etc/cups/cupsd.conf  
103     /usr/sbin/hald    
root    hald-runner    
root    [l2cap]    
root    [krfcommd]    
root    hald-addon-input: Listening on /dev/input/event4... 
root    /usr/lib/hal/hald-addon-cpufreq    
103     hald-addon-acpi: listening on acpid socket
root    hald-addon-storage: polling /dev/sr0 (every 2
root    hald-addon-storage: no polling on /dev/fd0...
root    /usr/sbin/gdm    
root    /usr/sbin/gdm    
root    /usr/bin/X :0 -audit 0 -auth
root    /sbin/getty 38400 tty1  
root    /sbin/getty 38400 tty2  
root    /sbin/getty 38400 tty3  
root    /sbin/getty 38400 tty4  
root    /sbin/getty 38400 tty5  
root    /sbin/getty 38400 tty6  
root    dhclient -v -pf /var/run/dhclient.eth0.pid -lf
root    [flush-8:0]    
root    [kauditd]    
root    /usr/sbin/console-kit-daemon --no-daemon   
user    /bin/sh /etc/xdg/xfce4/xinitrc -- /etc/X11/xinit/xserverrc 
user    /usr/bin/ssh-agent /usr/bin/dbus-launch --exit-with-session startxfce4 
user    /usr/bin/dbus-launch --exit-with-session startxfce4  
user    /usr/bin/dbus-daemon --fork --print-pid 5 --print-address
user    /usr/bin/xfce4-session    
user    /usr/lib/xfconf/xfconfd    
user    xfsettingsd    
user    xfwm4    
user    xfce4-panel    
user    Thunar --daemon   
user    xfdesktop    
user    /usr/lib/xfce4/panel-plugins/xfce4-menu-plugin socket_id 14680095 name xfce4-menu
user    /usr/lib/gvfs/gvfsd    
user    xfce4-settings-helper    
user    xfce4-terminal    
user    gnome-pty-helper    
user    bash    
root    su    
root    bash    

 

Not bad at all – nice and lightweight. The first bonus I found was that I had a great little XFCE system already running, from which to build my openbox setup. I figured once I had that running I could remove whatever I didn’t want. This meant that I had a working browser to research the install and any problems, configured terminal, editor, etc.

As I began working on the system’s internals, I definitely had the impression that this was something someone took some time to put together well. It had a refined quality to it. I also noticed attention to security details – lots of little and not-so-little settings and refinements that I wasn’t used to seeing in Arch’s default configurations. Debian packages are definitely put together carefully and well configured. At the same time Aptosid’s packages tend to be more vanilla and cutting edge than Debian proper.

Probably the biggest difference from Arch are the runlevels and init system. But I was used to this from Ubuntu, so I dug out my old notes, and I found that my experience with Arch put me in a good position to know what was happening and what to adjust to my liking. Most of it worked as is, and worked well.

Once I installed openbox (apt-get install openbox), I was immediately able to select openbox as my session and I was into the usual plain gray openbox desktop – nothing to it. Here’s what was running in the openbox session – even less:

Default Openbox session processes:

UID    CMD    
root    init [5]   
root    [kthreadd]    
root    [ksoftirqd/0]    
root    [migration/0]    
root    [migration/1]    
root    [kworker/1:0]    
root    [ksoftirqd/1]    
root    [kworker/0:1]    
root    [cpuset]    
root    [khelper]    
root    [netns]    
root    [sync_supers]    
root    [bdi-default]    
root    [kintegrityd]    
root    [kblockd]    
root    [kacpid]    
root    [kacpi_notify]    
root    [kacpi_hotplug]    
root    [kseriod]    
root    [kworker/1:1]    
root    [kswapd0]    
root    [ksmd]    
root    [fsnotify_mark]    
root    [aio]    
root    [crypto]    
root    [khubd]    
root    [ata_sff]    
root    [scsi_eh_0]    
root    [scsi_eh_1]    
root    [scsi_eh_2]    
root    [scsi_eh_3]    
root    [scsi_eh_4]    
root    [scsi_eh_5]    
root    [scsi_eh_6]    
root    [scsi_eh_7]    
root    [kworker/u:5]    
root    [kworker/u:6]    
root    [usbhid_resumer]    
root    [kstriped]    
root    [kjournald]    
root    udevd --daemon   
root    udevd --daemon   
root    udevd --daemon   
root    [kpsmoused]    
root    [kworker/0:2]    
root    [hd-audio0]    
daemon  /sbin/portmap    
root    /usr/sbin/rsyslogd -c4   
root    /usr/sbin/irqbalance    
root    /usr/sbin/famd -T 0  
root    /usr/sbin/gpm -m /dev/input/mice -t exps2
101     /usr/bin/dbus-daemon --system   
root    /usr/sbin/cron    
root    /usr/sbin/acpid    
root    [kondemand]    
root    /usr/sbin/bluetoothd    
root    [kconservative]    
root    /usr/sbin/cupsd -C /etc/cups/cupsd.conf  
103     /usr/sbin/hald    
root    hald-runner    
root    [l2cap]    
root    [krfcommd]    
root    hald-addon-input: Listening on /dev/input/event4 /dev/input/event2
root    /usr/lib/hal/hald-addon-cpufreq    
103     hald-addon-acpi: listening on acpid socket
root    hald-addon-storage: polling /dev/sr0 (every 2
root    hald-addon-storage: no polling on /dev/fd0...
root    /usr/sbin/gdm    
root    /usr/sbin/gdm    
root    /sbin/getty 38400 tty1  
root    /sbin/getty 38400 tty2  
root    /sbin/getty 38400 tty3  
root    /sbin/getty 38400 tty4  
root    /sbin/getty 38400 tty5  
root    /sbin/getty 38400 tty6  
root    dhclient -v -pf /var/run/dhclient.eth0.pid -lf
root    [flush-8:0]    
root    [kauditd]    
root    /usr/sbin/console-kit-daemon --no-daemon   
root    /usr/bin/X :0 -audit 0 -auth
user    /usr/bin/openbox    
user    /usr/bin/ssh-agent /usr/bin/dbus-launch --exit-with-session openbox-session 
user    /usr/bin/dbus-launch --exit-with-session openbox-session  
user    /usr/bin/dbus-daemon --fork --print-pid 5 --print-address
user    /usr/bin/xfce4-terminal    
user    /usr/lib/gvfs/gvfsd    
user    gnome-pty-helper    
user    bash    
root    su    
root    bash    

 
I then did a full upgrade. The devs recommend you always use apt-get directly. GUI apps like Synaptic can be used to search and explore the system, but they don’t handle Aptosid’s rolling release mechanisms. For a full system upgrade, they ask that you exit X and switch to runlevel 3 for the install. First I downloaded required packages while still in X:

apt-get update
apt-get dist-upgrade -d  # download but don't install yet

Then I exited X and:

init 3
apt-get dist-upgrade
apt-get clean
# and a reboot (or you can "init 5" to return to X)

 
Next I installed my printer, which is sometimes a hassle. Only things to resolve were getting the right 32 bit libraries for the driver and a little problem with scanning as a normal user – solutions for Debian on the Brother website worked. Then I installed the Nvidia proprietary driver – needed for the TV-Out on my card instead of nouveau.

With those working, I felt confident that I would be using Aptosid for good. I disabled gdm and set the system up to go straight into Openbox, and got into configuring it, turning off some unneeded daemons, etc. (details below).

Installing additional software is a breeze with apt-get, and the packages are PGP signed. I was happy to find that every single piece of software I wanted was in the repos, including a handful that had been in Arch’s AUR. And I carefully removed a few things, although I found the default XFCE components were small and reasonable, so I left a lot of it be – never hurts to have alternate apps available.

Moving my home folder from Arch left all my software configured – it all worked perfectly – no adjustments to the home folder were required.

When all was done, my system used 3.33GB, compared to 3.88GB on Arch, which surprised me. Same software plus the XFCE stuff I didn’t have on Arch came out smaller! Part of the explanation could be the fact that Aptosid offers split packages for libreOffice, so I only installed writer and calc.

The system has been running well for several days – thus far it is very stable and fast. In general I’m very impressed with how much I was able to accomplish with relatively little effort.

Like Arch, Aptosid is cutting edge, so occasional breakage is the norm. On my most recent dist upgrade the nvidia kernel source build gave an error, so I stuck with the previous kernel. This is a known issue having to do with Nvidia not keeping up, and the Aptosid devs recommended just using the prior kernel for the time being. Someone also posted an easy fix for the source, but I haven’t tried that. That is the only unresolved issue I have at this point. Looking at and using my desktop, I wouldn’t even know I changed distros.

The main difference is with Arch you install software and configure it, whereas with Aptosid the software is more carefully configured, but you may want to trim back some things. With the lighter components I used this was very minimal, and I actually appreciated using a configuration that had some work already put into it. Aptosid seems nicely positioned between the bare minimum of Arch and the overdone complexity of Ubuntu.

So based on a few days worth of experiences, I definitely am liking Aptosid, which I find to be an interesting mix of concepts. It’s rolling release and ‘unstable’, yet polished and refined, and quite stable for use (thus far, and from what I’ve read). It’s a small distro, yet can take advantage of the huge repos and issue support of Debian (many solutions to problems are on Debian forums, and I still use the Arch Wiki as well – much of the content is generic). And the packages seem to be sanely configured with an emphasis on security. Nice job Aptosid!

Nitty Gritty

Below are my detailed and commented install notes, which show how I resolved a few problems and got things working the way I wanted.

# INSTALL NOTES FOR aptosid-2011-01-geras-xfce-amd64-201102051540

apt-get update

# disabled swap in fstab

# install openbox and some basic apps
apt-get install nano openbox geany

# Disable gvfs daemon (disabling it this way will cause it to come back
# on an update, so I will look for a better solution
mv /usr/share/dbus-1/services/gvfs-daemon.service \
   /usr/share/dbus-1/services/gvfs-daemon.service-disabled
mv /usr/share/dbus-1/services/gvfs-metadata.service \
   /usr/share/dbus-1/services/gvfs-metadata.service-disabled

# Disable password agents
sed -i 's/^use-ssh-agent[[:blank:]]*/#use-ssh-agent/' /etc/X11/Xsession.options

# Remove insane syntax highlighting in nano
sed -i 's/^\(include .*\)/#\1/' /etc/nanorc  # fix colors

# Add some items to /etc/sysctl.conf:
    # Disable the magic-sysrq key (console security issues)
    kernel.sysrq = 0

    # Enable TCP SYN Cookie Protection
    net.ipv4.tcp_syncookies = 1

    # Reduce disk activity for SSD to 240 seconds
    vm.dirty_ratio = 40
    vm.dirty_background_ratio = 1
    vm.dirty_writeback_centisecs = 24000

# Add to rc.local for SSD:
    # Set sda to use deadline scheduler
    echo deadline > /sys/block/sda/queue/scheduler
    echo 1 > /sys/block/sda/queue/iosched/fifo_batch

# Install some more software
apt-get install amule amule-utils asunder chkrootkit clamav claws-mail \
claws-mail-trayicon crystalcursors deluge-gtk dnsutils dosfstools file-roller \
flashplugin-nonfree fsarchiver geeqie gftp-gtk ghex gimp gtk2-engines imagemagick \
inotify-tools jhead ktsuss leafpad libgd2-xpm-dev libreoffice-calc \
libreoffice-writer lxpanel mencoder mozilla-plugin-vlc mpg123 netcat-openbsd \
partimage pcal pdnsd pianobar pidgin rdate roxterm secure-delete shell-fm \
smplayer smplayer-themes speedcrunch sqlite3 stunnel sun-java6-jre synaptic \
tango-icon-theme ttf-mscorefonts-installer unetbootin unrar uuid-runtime vlc \
x11-apps xdiskusage xpad xscreensaver xterm

# Setup my Brother MFC-7420 Laser Printer/Scanner:

    # add user to lpadmin group so user password can configure cups
    gpasswd -a user lpadmin

    # Install the drivers (some errors below are normal)
    apt-get install ia32-libs 
    dpkg -i --force-all --force-architecture brmfc7420lpr-2.0.1-1.i386.deb
    mkdir /usr/share/cups/model/
    dpkg -i --force-all --force-architecture cupswrapperMFC7420-2.0.1-2.i386.deb
    ln -s /usr/lib/libbrcomplpr2.so /usr/lib32/libbrcomplpr2.so
    dpkg -i brscan2-0.2.4-0.amd64.deb

    # Visit http://localhost:631 to admin cups

    # Let users in group scanner use scanner:
    nano /etc/udev/rules.d/z60_libsane.rules  # creates file, add:
        # Brother
        SYSFS{idVendor}=="04f9", MODE="0666", GROUP="scanner", ENV{libsane_matched}="yes"

    # Fix printer margins for newer cups:
    nano /usr/local/Brother/inf/brMFC7420rc  # change:
        PaperType=Letter

# Video Card Setup
    # first edit /etc/apt/sources.list.d/debian.list to include unstable non-free
    apt-get update
    apt-get install nvidia-kernel-source nvidia-kernel-common dmakms
    echo nvidia-kernel-source >> /etc/default/dmakms
    m-a a-i nvidia-kernel-source
    apt-get install nvidia-glx
    # REBOOT
    # Manual Notes:
    #    # When xorg updates you only need to reinstall nvidia-glx:
    #        apt-get install --reinstall nvidia-glx
    #    # When the nvidia-kernel-source is updated:
    #        m-a a-i nvidia-kernel-source
    #        apt-get install --reinstall nvidia-glx

# Disable gdm:
update-rc.d gdm disable

# Add another user
useradd -s /bin/bash -m -u 1001 extrauser
usermod -G extrauser cdrom,audio,video,users

# Build pcmanfm-mod without hal support (hal is running on aptosid but I don't
# use the pcmanfm-mod volume management).  (Aptosid uses fam by default and this
# seems to work better than gamin did in Arch.)
apt-get install intltool pkg-config libgtk2.0-dev libstartup-notification0-dev libfam-dev
# skip install of: libhal-storage-dev libhal-dev
# unpack pcmanfm-mod tarball
./configure --disable-hal --prefix=/usr  # HAL support disabled this way
make
sudo make install
sudo install -c -m 755 pcmanfm-opener /usr/bin
sudo update-mime-database /usr/share/mime
sudo update-desktop-database

# Stop PC speaker beeping
nano /etc/inputrc  # edit:
    set bell-style none
nano /etc/modprobe.d/blacklist  # add:
    blacklist pcspkr

# Repair windows key - by default it was mapped to another key which caused
# my openbox keyboard shortcuts to not work:
# Info: http://bda.ath.cx/blog/2010/11/14/windows-key-in-aptosidsiduxdebian/
nano /etc/default/keyboard  # change:
    XKBOPTIONS="lv3:ralt_switch,compose:lwin,grp:alt_shift_toggle"
# to:
    XKBOPTIONS="lv3:ralt_switch,grp:alt_shift_toggle"

# FULL UPDATE
apt-get update
apt-get dist-upgrade -d  # downloads but not install
# IMPORTANT: exit X, login to tty
init 3
apt-get dist-upgrade
apt-get clean

# edit /etc/sudoers with desired defaults

# Set static IP:
nano /etc/network/interfaces  # disable dhcp line and add:
    # Static
    iface eth0 inet static
    address 192.168.1.100
    netmask 255.255.255.0
    network 192.168.1.0
    broadcast 192.168.1.255
    gateway 192.168.1.1

# Note: the default init script for pdnsd didn't work for me because it seemed
# to have an error in it, and it also expected the cache to be in the default
# location.  So I disabled that script and installed a modified one.

# Add more loop devices 1 thru 7
nano /etc/modules   # add:
    loop max_loop=8

# Add libdvdcss2 for DVDs:
gpg --recv-keys 07DC563D1F41B907 && gpg -a --export 07DC563D1F41B907 | sudo apt-key add -
# edit /etc/apt/sources.list.d/debian.list to include:
    deb http://www.debian-multimedia.org sid main
apt-get update
apt-get install libdvdcss2

# Fix crystal cursor missing drag-n-drop cursors
cd /usr/share/icons/crystalgreen/cursors
ln -s question_arrow dnd-ask
ln -s link dnd-link
ln -s left_ptr dnd-move
ln -s left_ptr dnd-none

# Install Google Earth 6
    # NOTE: To prevent exim4 MTA being installed as a dependency for lsb-core
    # I created a dummy package (exim4 is not really needed):
	apt-get install equivs
	nano exim4.ctl  # create, add contents:
		Section: web
		Package: exim4-dummy
		Provides: exim4, exim4-base, exim4-config, exim4-daemon-light, mailutils
		Description: EXIM4 dummy package
		 This package provides dpkg with the information that
		 there is a local mail server installed.
	equivs-build exim4.ctl
	dpkg -i exim4-dummy_1.0_all.deb

    # NOTE: To prevent at being installed as a dependency for lsb-core
    # I created a dummy package:
	apt-get install equivs
	nano at.ctl  # create, add contents:
		Section: web
		Package: at-dummy
		Provides: at
		Description: at dummy package
		 This package provides dpkg with the information that
		 this package is installed.
	equivs-build at.ctl
	dpkg -i at-dummy_1.0_all.deb

    # Download google-earth-stable_current_amd64.deb (from earth.google.com)
    dpkg -i google-earth-stable_current_amd64.deb
    apt-get intall ia32-libs ia32-libs-gtk lsb-core
    # someone said lib32nss-mdns was needed but it doesn't appear to be
    # with above, works but no image - add nvidia 32bit libs (thanks dibl)
    apt-get install nvidia-glx-ia32

    # IMPORTANT: google deb also installs:
        /etc/cron.daily/google-earth
        /etc/apt/sources.list.d/google-earth.list
        plus some mime stuff in /usr/share/applications
    # so I remove it:
    rm /etc/cron.daily/google-earth
    rm /etc/apt/sources.list.d/google-earth.list
    nano /usr/share/applications/mimeinfo.cache   # remove google entries
    nano /usr/share/applications/defaults.list   # remove google entries
        application/keyhole=google-earth.desktop
        application/vnd.google-earth.kml+xml=google-earth.desktop
        application/vnd.google-earth.kmz=google-earth.desktop
        application/earthviewer=google-earth.desktop
    # NOTE: Since its closed-source, consider running google-earth in a sandbox
    #       such as sandfox.

# Uninstall some unneeded (by me) and unwanted things:  (frees 146MB)  (I checked
# these carefully for dependencies, otherwise apt-get can take out half your system -
# use "apt-get -s remove PKGNAME" to simulate and see what it will do, or check using
# Synaptic (but always use apt-get directly to do the actual removal)
apt-get purge abiword aptosid-manual-de bluetooth bluez br2684ctl busybox ceni \
cifs-utils fluxbox foo2zjs gcalctool gnumeric gpicview gxine gxineplugin hpijs \
hpijs-ppds hplip hplip-cups hplip-data iceweasel-l10n-de lvm2 mc mlocate \
myspell-de-de nmap openssh-server orage pcmciautils ristretto samba-common splix \
squeeze thunar-volman transmission vpnc xarchiver xfburn

# Remove unneeded locales (languages) to free 300MB:
apt-get install localepurge  # unselect all but selected ones in your language!
localepurge

# Fix clock keeps changing on every boot
nano /etc/default/rcS  # change:
    UTC=no

# disable daemons I don't want (many of these don't actually start and some aren't
# even installed anymore, but I trim them anyway).  I use a script for this:
update-rc.d acpid disable
update-rc.d atd disable
update-rc.d bluetooth disable
update-rc.d clamav-freshclam disable
update-rc.d cpufrequtils disable
update-rc.d cryptdisks disable
update-rc.d cryptdisks-early disable
update-rc.d dns-clean disable
update-rc.d exim4 disable
update-rc.d fuse disable
update-rc.d lvm2 disable
update-rc.d pcmciautils disable
update-rc.d pppd-dns disable
update-rc.d resolvconf disable
update-rc.d saned disable
update-rc.d ssh disable
update-rc.d stunnel4 disable
update-rc.d virtualbox-ose-guest-utils disable

# Yet to do:
# install the genuine cdrtools instead of wodim
# disable ipv6 for speed?

March 31, 2011 Posted by | Tips | 67 Comments

   

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